Guidelines

The wordmark is shorthand for Princeton Engineering, which is itself a familiar name for the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science. Always keep your audience in mind when determining how prominent the full name of the school should be on a publication.

Internal

For internal audiences, the mark will become so familiar that it alone will represent the school. On internal materials, such as course listings, posters, and t-shirts, the wordmark can stand alone to signify the school.

External

On external publications, the full name of the school should be included to reinforce the mark. The ‘lockup’ shown here provides a systematic way to join the word- mark and the school name.

If the school name is prominently placed elsewhere on the publication it need not also be locked to the wordmark.

The Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science is comprised of six departments, as well as several research centers. Faculty and students often feel a strong affiliation with their individual department. The graphic architecture allows departments and centers to identify themselves on their own materials by locking their name to the wordmark.

Princeton University

School of Engineering and Applied Science

Engineering school departments

When used for an external audience, the full name of the school should also appear somewhere on the document.

Engineering school sample centers

When used for an external audience, the full name of the school should also appear somewhere on the document.

The wordmark and lockup are designed to work as a system. Always use the artwork as it is supplied. Do not recreate it or alter it in any way.

The wordmark

‘Princ ton’ is set in Monticello Roman. The ‘E’ is a custom character drawn for this mark. The letters are spaced and scaled to work well together.

Always use the supplied artwork.

DO NOT attempt to retype the wordmark using a bold typed E or recreate or alter the mark in any way.

The lockup

The school, department or center name should always be set in Franklin Gothic bold (except when using the 2 socket lockup as shown on page 6).

The space between the name and the wordmark equals 1/2 the height of the ‘E’ in the wordmark. The name always aligns left with the left edge of the ‘E’ and never extends past the end of the ‘N.’

This also applies to department and center names.

Whenever possible, the wordmark and name should be proportioned to one another as shown above.

When the lockup is printed small, the name can be slightly larger proportionately for legibility sake (example at left).

However, the name should NEVER extend beyond the ‘N’ in the word- mark (examples at right).

The wordmark plus school, department or center name ‘lockup’ is an orderly yet flexible system. The special ‘E’ is used as a reference point, to which the other type can be aligned.

The school name may be aligned below the E (with a 1/2 ‘E’ height space between).

This also applies to department and center names.

The school name may also appear in two lines above or below the wordmark, or in one line below.

These arrangements should only be used at a large enough scale so that the name is still legible.

The lockup also accommodates adding both a department name and the school name at once. This arrangement works well on simple applications, but should be used with care in more complicated settings.

When both the school and department name are plugged in, the department name should be set in Franklin Gothic bold, and the school name should be set in Franklin Gothic book.

The wordmark has been carefully typeset using a custom drawing of the typeface Monticello, and a custom- drawn ‘E.’ It should always be used as placed art to maintain consistency. Digital files are available from the Office of Communications.

don’ts

The wordmark and lockup should be isolated from other type and graphics by at least one E-height.

The wordmark and name should be printed in black or reversed out of white whenever possible. Princeton Orange (PMS 158) should be used as a supporting color but should not be used to print the wordmark or lockup unless printing in one color orange.

The lockup may appear black on a white or light color background.

The lockup may be white on a black or dark color background.

Hint: when Franklin Gothic bold (or any heavy typeface) is knocked out of a dark background, slightly increased tracking will improve legibility.

ONLY if a document is printed in one color that is not black, and the lockup cannot be knocked out of that color, may the lockup appear in a color other than black or white.

DO NOT make the lockup a color other than black or white.

DO NOT make the ‘E’ a different color than the rest of the lockup.

DO NOT make the name a different color than the wordmark.

To maintain legibility, the lockup may ONLY be placed on a photo or pattern that is low in contrast.

DO NOT place the lockup on a busy background that reduces legibility.

In some print publications or web sites, it may be desirable to place the wordmark in a black band with the name of the school, department or center ‘hanging’ above or below the band. This is an acceptable arrangement as long as the elements maintain their legibility and read as a coherent unit.

The band should be at least twice the height of the wordmark, and the wordmark should be centered within it.

The school, department or center name should be the same size in proportion to the wordmark as in all other examples.

The workmark and the name should always be black or knocked out to white, but they may be inverse of one another.

The two line school name may likewise straddle the band. It can also appear entirely within the band.

When the band is flush with the bottom of a page, the space below the wordmark may exceed the space above.

The space between the name and the band should remain equal to the top margin within the band.

On some materials—particularly for outside audiences—both the University signature and the engineering school wordmark should be included. The Engineering signature is derived from the University signature, and shares its typographic basis. They are meant to work well together on publications, but not to be placed side by side. Please follow the rules of thumb below.

Digital art for the University signature and guidelines pertaining to its use are available to the Princeton community for use on University related publications. Please contact the Office of Communications (Megan Peterson, meganp@princeton.edu, 609.258.5730; or Laurel Masten Cantor, lmcantor@princeton.edu, 609.258.5734).

The engineering mark and the University signature should NOT be placed right next to one another.

In these examples, the two marks appear in opposite corners, or on opposite sides of a poster.

On a two-sided publication such as a booklet or a postcard, the engineering mark may appear on the front while the University signature appears on the back (see page 20).

On a website, the engineering mark may appear in the header and the University signature in the footer (see page 21).

In some situations, the shield, instead of the full University signature, can be included to tie a publication to the University.

Digital art for the shield and guidelines pertaining to its use are available to the Princeton community for use on University related publications. Please contact the Office of Communications (Megan Peterson, meganp@ princeton.edu, 609.258.5730; or Laurel Masten Cantor, lmcantor@ princeton.edu, 609.258.5734).

The shield should NOT be added to the lockup in most circumstances because the resulting mark becomes unwieldy.

The ‘E’ of the wordmark offers a good alignment point for a shield as shown below.

In these examples, the shield shares a horizontal or vertical alignment with the lockup.

On a two-sided publication such as a booklet or a postcard, the engineering mark may appear on the front while the shield appears on the back (see page 17).

Princeton Engineering publications should follow the typographic conventions established for the University at large. See the University-wide ‘Guide to Princeton’s Graphic Identity’ for more detail.

Princeton Monticello Regular, Italic, Bold and Bold Italic are recommended for use as text and display faces in all Princeton publications.

Princeton Monticello can be downloaded free of charge by the Princeton community at www.princeton.edu/identity.

Princeton Monticello Display can be used for headlines in print publications and at large point sizes on posters, signage and other large format applications.

In general, the display face should NOT be used smaller than 12 point.

Franklin Gothic is the recommended sans serif typeface. Franklin Gothic is available on most PCs. Mac users can purchase Franklin Gothic from several online sources. ITC Franklin Gothic, the recommended version, is shown here.

Hint: When setting Franklin Gothic in all caps, it is often advisable to track out the letters 80–120 units (shown at 80 here).

Monticello and Franklin Gothic should only be used on the web as image. They should not be specified in HTML since many computers will not have these fonts available. As an alternative, please use the sans serif typeface Verdana.

The sans serif typeface Verdana is also designed to be exceptionally legible on screen.